FanFueled in the Press: The Ticket Service That Pays You Back

11 Nov

The word is out about FanFueled, and people are taking notice.  The Chicago Reader’s Miles Rayner spoke last week with FanFueled CEO and founder Anderson Bell about FanFueled’s vision for an evolved, socially-driven approach to the ticketing industry.  The article came out today – give it a read here. Here’s an excerpt:

FanFueled determines its fees according to a transparent system: $1.49 for tickets under $25, $2.49 for tickets more than $25 but less than $100, and so on up to a maximum of $4.49 for tickets that cost more than $200. (The service is free to organizers of free ticketed events.) If you’ve bought a ticket lately through Ticketmaster or any of its affiliates, like Live Nation or TicketWeb, the first thing that will strike you about these numbers is that they’re small. Ticketmaster tacks a $12.15 service fee onto a $149.50 Sade ticket, for instance; FanFueled would charge $3.49. Tickets to Atreyu’s House of Blues date next week have a face value of $23, but Live Nation adds a $2 facility charge and a $9.05 convenience fee—which compares pretty unfavorably with the $1.49 FanFueled would charge.

Rayner’s comparison is clear: for music fans on a budget (and who isn’t these days?), the extreme service fees that the established ticketing giants charge can be a dealbreaker.  And even if you’re willing to shell out, that extra money is cash you’re not going to spend on a CD or t-shirt at the show, depriving the bands of a serious chunk of their revenue. (According to a 2004 Rolling Stone article, merchandise sales are the biggest income source for bands both large and small.)  The FanFueled model is good for everyone – well, except for Ticketmaster.  It saves the fans money, it decreases the cost of marketing and promoting shows for event organizers, and it puts a bigger share of the wealth in the hands of artists.

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